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Maitrayee B's blog

Stree - "In her feet, an entire universe"

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I am watching Satyajit Ray’s Ghare Baire again after many years. Keenly, I watch the iconic scene where the female protagonist Bimala steps out of her antar mahal with her husband into a world where she is far more aware of her self worth, conscious about things around her. I think to myself, had this been a Ekta Kapoor serial, the exact moment where the female protagonist raises her leg to cross the threshold would have been played over and over again for at least twenty minutes worth of television time, the music might have changed from an approaching soft, to a thunderous crescendo depicting the momentous, and yet here everything is subdued, even nonchalant?

Amazing Women - Shefali Razdan Duggal

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Our series on ‘Amazing Women’ seeks to bring out women who have given themselves a dimension other than what they have been born with. They can be thinkers, doers, achievers, but mostly they are women who stand out, in any time, in any era.

 

Shefali Razdan Duggal, is a well known face for many, a member of the Democratic National Committee’s National Finance Committee and Co-Chair for the DNC Women’s Leadership Forum, Shefali is also  on the White House Council of Women & Girls (chaired by President Barack Obama’s Senior Advisor Valerie Jarrett) and is currently a Co-Chair for the Ready for Hillary PAC.

Stree

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As Stree, I’m tired of being typecast. We are no one in particular, no one in general, we are who we are- as much a matter of celebration, as not- I am everything and all of them & yet not. Three women-beautiful, powerful & grey. Begum Akhtar, Sharmila Tagore ( In Apur Sansar) and Durga( The deity)

Poetry is personal, often jarring, unfathomable, beautiful- it is the closest to what I feel is a woman. And so these poems – neither tribute, nor a commentary, often a  reflection. .From one Stree to another.

 

 

Stree - "A Blue Wall and Green Mangoes"

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While reading a piece by the BBC travel desk titled ’50 reasons to love the world’, a quote by travel contributor, Gavin Haines caught my eye. While citing his reasons forloving the world, he writes, ‘Because sometimes even extraordinary buildings like the Taj Mahal are humbled by the simple beauty of everyday life.’ In many ways the lines captures the ordinary majesty of travel that many travelers miss out. I am reminded of very still afternoon somewhere in North Kerala, where I was on a road trip about two years ago.

Stree - "Three women and a train"

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Since childhood, I’ve been afraid of flying, a weakness I’m not proud of, but having said that as a possible side effect of this fear I’ve had some extremely interesting train journeys, many of which have been through the most circuitous routes possible. Many a times, these journeys have resulted in my meeting some of the most fascinating people; I might have otherwise never had the chance to observe. Indian Railways isn’t of course known to have the cleanest or the most secure of stations and trains, which leads to the added hassle that my family goes through every time I board a train. Thankfully the subtext of that fear does not always surface, allowing me to settle down into the journey pretty early on.

Stree - "Silent Seekers"

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Throughout my school life I was a wallflower, the eternal introvert, the one aspect that gave me tremendous solace through this lonely journey was watching people. People carry friends through their lives, I carried curiosity and innumerable nameless faces who have enfolded their stories in front of me. Most of these are stories maybe those without consequence, and yet as any writer/observer will tell you in the right hands and mind every inconsequential story has shape, scent and flavor and in the end it is always what YOU see and how you see, that matters more that what is shown. 

Forever Young - Zohra Sehgal

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I am watching Abbas Kirostami’s film ‘Taste of Cherry’, a depressed man Mr. Baidi wants to commit suicide and searches for someone who can cover his grave with mud once he is gone. In the process, he meets an Azeri taxidermist, who explains to him in the about the beauty of life, the sweetness of Mulberries, the zest to live life and how lovely a well lived life could be, if touched by the right fragrance.

"Nirbhaya - A discussion with Poorna Jagannathan.

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NIRBHAYA was created in response to the violent gang rape and subsequent death of a Delhi medical student in December, 2012. "Nirbhaya" was the name given to the victim by the press as she lay fighting for her life in a hospital bed following her assault. It means "fearless."December 16th marks the day when the young girl got onto the bus and was brutally raped.
 
If the world is a stage and not a film and we but characters in it, then ‘Nirbhaya’ is the story of everyone whose voice has been silent so long. Here five people tell you stories of their lives, stories suppressed so long and in that the play is as much their coming of age, as it is a telling of the story of Nirbhaya, the name given to the girl gang raped in New Delhi in early 2012.

100 Years of Indian Cinema - "Ek Din Achanak"

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 What is it that stands out for us in these 100 years of Indian cinema, art, women, creativity, sensitivity, entertainment, have these come of age? and precious not only for a pause in time..but for all times.

We take a look at five films here, films that cover a wide spectrum and belong to different genres, films that a wide range of people will be able to relate to. Come take a peek...

The first film in this series : "Dance of the Wind" Our second film : Vijay Singh's "Jaya Ganga"

The third pick : Mrinal Sen's "Ek Din Achanak"

100 Years of Indian Cinema - Jaya Ganga

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What is it that stands out for us in these 100 years of Indian cinema, art, women, creativity, sensitivity, entertainment, have these come of age? and precious not only for a pause in time..but for all times.
We take a look at five films here, films that cover a wide spectrum and belong to different genres, films that a wide range of people will be able to relate to. Come take a peek...

The first film in this series : "Dance of the Wind"

Our second film is Vijay Singh's "Jaya Ganga"

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